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Reddit The Hateful Eight

The plot shows who is or is not who they claim they are, much as in a movie with alien body-snatchers or demonic possession, and it's just as awful as when someone on The Walking Dead transforms into a zombie. Because death is ubiquitous in The Hateful Eight. There IS a monster sitting right next you, a demon hidden under the floor, and sometimes, as Kurt Russell and Keith David discovered at the conclusion of The Thing, there is nothing that can rescue you. So you simply sit there waiting to die. Images courtesy of The Weinstein Company

There were moments in Quentin Tarantino's latest western The Hateful Eight when I questioned whether the customary exaggerated cartoon violence was really required. Isn't it the most basic sort of entertainment? Doesn't this call Tarantino's claim to be a great director into question? Maybe he's overrated after all, I reasoned. Then I trembled as I envisaged a world without Tarantino. Because, whereas most movies have safe, by-the-numbers plotlines (like the current Star Wars), Tarantino's films are deliciously surprising. He has accomplished the impossible by creating enormous box office blockbusters using his own set of rules. And it's difficult to imagine someone else filling the void if Tarantino didn't exist.

You may recall a furious Quentin Tarantino almost canceling The Hateful Eight when the script was leaked online. If not, here's a brief refresher: In January 2014, the whole screenplay for Tarantino's newest film was leaked on the internet, allegedly by an agent for one of the actors given the script. Only three individuals had it at the time: Bruce Dern, Michael Madsen, and Tim Roth. Tarantino was so enraged that he vowed to abandon the film totally. But let's return to the present, where The Hateful Eight will be released on Christmas (with a new screenplay) and many of the actors appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live on Monday. The presenter wasted no time in grilling the actors about who was behind the leak. Madsen seems to be a red herring in this case; he is just too evident. Bruce Dern is my pick. Grandpa, your sweet-old-guy act isn't fooling me.

As authoritative as youd expect: Major Marquis Warren is played by Samuel L. Jackson. Allstar/The Weinstein Company Photograph Some have claimed that Tarantino's depiction of Daisy was sexist, but such charges are false; Tarantino treats all of his characters with equally insignificant scorn. With the exception of Jackie Brown (still the director's greatest and least regarded work), his films often forego content or true emotion in favor of postmodern frisson. That isn't always an issue; a beguiling surface may be one of cinema's greatest joys, but it must be snare-drum tight rather than bass-drum saggy. Despite the title, there is nothing to dislike here. However, what there is to adore risks being lost in a blizzard of wordiness and a snowstorm of fashionably self-referential insularity.

The Hateful Eight Reddit Review

Are you beginning to see pictures? Quentin Tarantino's newest film is a talky quasi-western set in the still-unresolved aftermath of the American Civil War. It's everything you'd expect from this exasperatingly unruly writer-director: cinematically adventurous, generically self-conscious, entertainingly performed, and editorially ill-disciplined. It's shot in super-wide Ultra Panavision 70 and released in standard multiplex format and extended 70mm roadshow versions. Among its many delights is Robert Richardson's superbly choreographed cinematography, which masterfully captures both the landscape poetry of the American interior west, as well as the chamber-piece stagings of the western interiors a cabin, a barn, and a stagecoach, in which much of the action takes place. The grizzled male ensemble delivers some raucously hairy performances, while Jennifer Jason Leigh's black-eyed antiheroine shows more than a match for any guy. Despite its theatrical triumphs (the screenplay was notably staged as a live stage reading in April 2014), The Hateful Eight is plagued by Tarantino's excessive tics and longueurs.

'The Hateful Eight' Review: Quentin Tarantino Shows He Can Get Away With Anything

The Hateful Eight, directed by Quentin Tarantino, begins with a long musical overture featuring a static picture of a silhouetted stagecoach and a fresh new Ennio Morricone soundtrack. Minutes later, we were presented to a beautiful snowy scene taken on 65mm film with the long-deserted Ultra Panasonic 70 lenses, a feat highlighted in the credits with Quentin Tarantino's announcement of his eighth picture. Then there's a full hour of tale set inside a stagecoach, followed by two more inside a cabin split by a 12-minute interlude.

Yes, The Hateful Eight has gratuitous violence, but maybe I did Tarantino a disservice. This film is about race and the aftermath of a civil war, with its atrocities, massacres, heroism, hate, prejudice, honor, and bravery. Perhaps the only way for art to reach such extremes is to be extreme itself. What is evident is that we are watching a filmmaker who is so confident in his ability to amuse that he will use the most obnoxious techniques: it is a delight to watch.

All of the above may be found in his most recent film, The Hateful Eight. But after viewing it, I'm wondering whether Tarantino's whole theme was to play with his audience's expectations. That's not to suggest Hateful Eight is an anti-Tarantino picture, a la Michael Bay's Pain and Gain, but the pace and conclusion seem a little odd.

The Hateful Eight Ending Reddit

The plot shows who is or is not who they claim they are, much as in a movie with alien body-snatchers or demonic possession, and it's just as awful as when someone on The Walking Dead transforms into a zombie. Because death is ubiquitous in The Hateful Eight. There IS a monster sitting right next you, a demon hidden under the floor, and sometimes, as Kurt Russell and Keith David discovered at the conclusion of The Thing, there is nothing that can rescue you. So you simply sit there waiting to die. Images courtesy of The Weinstein Company

What follows is a Western/Agatha Christie-style whodunit in which several men and women participate in talk and gunfire in the haberdashery, including Dern, who portrays a Civil War general whose son seems to have been slain by Jackson.

Jackson reveals in exquisite and terrible detail how he forced the general's son to perform oral sex on him before murdering him at one of several instances when the crowd screamed their delight.

So, not long ago, I created a video essay on Quentin Tarantino's 2015 film The Hateful Eight. I specifically discussed how violence was depicted in the film. Critics gave the film mixed reviews because of its moral nihilism and persistent violence. Even some of the originally heroic characters turn out to be horrible murders, making it difficult for the spectator to cheer for anybody. However, I believe this is on purpose. The Hateful Eight seems to make a point of depicting violence that is neither justified nor necessary. Major Marquis Warren's character is not made better by avenging his people during the civil war; in fact, the more we discover about his combat record, the less likable he becomes. The character of John Ruth is not made more sympathetic for bringing criminals to justice (a la Django Unchained); instead, with each humiliation he lays on his weak prisoner, he seems to be a swaggering bully. Anti-heroes on the violent fringe are not shown as decent individuals employing violence for good purposes, but rather as people who like violence for its own sake.

The Hateful Eight is one of the few Quentin Tarantino films that did not create a big impression, for better or worse. Was the lackluster response justified? When Quentin Tarantino releases a new film, it is usually a cultural milestone that catches the zeitgeist. Pulp Fiction spawned a series of imitators, Django Unchained sparked outrage with its slavery-era vengeance fantasy, and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood reignited interest in the 1960s.

The Hateful Eight Explained Reddit

The debut of new films is usually a good opportunity to revisit classic films by directors you like. This week marks the debut of Tarantino's ninth picture, and in preparation, I decided to revisit a number of his earlier works. It's just my luck that his prior picture was just re-released as an exclusive extended version on Netflix in April. Guide to Content

Mannix isn't the final winner of The Hateful Eight, as he was in the film's early stages, but he is the only character whose deception remains uncertain at the conclusion. The Lincoln letter both demonstrates the breadth of the film's and the Civil War's racial undercurrents and discredits Warren. Mannix, on the other hand, cannot help but admire Warren's trickery. He applauds Warren's use of Lincoln's wife Mary Todd's name to sell the letter to its reader, a painful detail that would pique the interest of possible skeptics. According to Screen Rant, the new ending ally Mannix and Warren, and instead of one guy standing in the ruins of a shoot-out, the two men, one black and one white, are the surprise deliverers of justice. Daisy Domergue is hanged, and it might all be due of the reversal of the Lincoln letter. Images courtesy of The Weinstein Company and Giphy (2)

Ruth and Oswaldo had a brief conversation regarding Joe Gage.

The sequence with Bob, the plucked chicken, and how a plucked chicken is bad luck, as well as the reward on Major Warren's head that Chris Mannix informs General Smithers about, is cut. It cuts to John Ruth stating his belief that someone in Minnie's is trying to release Daisy.

Meanwhile, Daisy's brother Jody, who was hiding in the basement, managed to get more down before dying, further hurting Mannix and injuring Warren.

But arguably the most significant shift is conceptual. The original version does not seem to allow for underlying socioeconomic and racial political issues to fully play out, as Mannix and Warren collaborate throughout most of the third act. Rather than your traditional slaughter followed by one-man-left-standing scenario, Tarantino's tweaks are perhaps for the better.

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